Are You Making A Good Impression On Amazon?

optimize for AmazonThe value of a positive first impression has never lost its importance. Before the worldwide Internet, first impressions were exclusively made by a firm handshake or witty pick-up line. Now, we see it more and more, the increased importance of making a good first impression online.

Last year alone 44 percent of all U.S. e-commerce sales were on Amazon, giving product manufacturers and resellers plenty of opportunities to make an impression on the platform. When it comes to selling products on Amazon, an optimized product page is absolutely vital to making a positive first impression.

Digiday has some good advice. Sellers should view product pages like “brand-marketing vehicles.” Capitalize on the opportunities Amazon presents to create custom campaigns that are not as easily executed on Google or Facebook.

So, how do you make a great first impression with your Amazon product page that will be a lasting impression for your audience? Here are four basic product listing tips.

  1. Give Us Your Best One-Liner. Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Your product title is the hook that must grab your audience’s attention from the get-go. Decide now which keywords you plan on using through the entire page and include these in the title. Select your keywords by understanding what Amazon customers are searching for related to your product. Keywords should also reflect what makes your product. Does your product come in different colors? Is it made with a special recyclable material? This consistency will keep buyers on track and will set your product apart from the rest. Along with the keywords, the title should include the manufacturer, company and brand name. You have 250 characters, make them count and be sure to give details that are complementary to your product.
  2. Put Your Best Face Forward. Or your best nine. For your listing, Amazon allows nine photos, use all of them (if you have nine good ones). The main takeaway for buyers will be the photos you choose, so follow these guidelines closely. The main image that will appear in the listing needs to be taken against a “plain white background and cannot include watermarks, infographics or anything that may deceive the customer.”1Photos should be at least 1000 pixels in width and 500 pixels in height. Include photos of the product from various angles and show photos of the product in use. Buyers are all about the visuals, make sure the first impression of the product is captivating.
  3. Lead with Your Best. In the key product features section of the listing, you have 1000 characters to lead with the best details and facts about your product. Convince potential buyers why they should buy your product over the competitors by highlighting what makes you different. Additionally, imagine what questions may arise about your product and address them now or describe what problems your product solves.
  4.  Go All In With Your Product Description. If you haven’t sold them by now on your product, here is your last chance to bring it home. Here’s where you should tell a story, describe the buyer’s journey and how this product will enhance the buyer’s life in some way. You have 2000 characters for the product description so be sure to mention any warranties, guarantees or go into greater detailer on key features mentioned in the key product features section.

 

Your potential success with your audience will be dependable on how accurately you describe your product and its features. In fact, 29% of consumers start their product searches on Amazon2, so your product page serving as a positive first impression is more important than ever.

For more best practices for making your Amazon product page stand out, contact our digital team.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

1.The 6 Most Important Factors for Amazon Product Listing Optimization.  https://startupbros.com/6-amazon-product-listing-optimization/

2.Inside Amazon’s Pitch to Agencies.https://digiday.com/marketing/inside-amazons-pitch-agencies/

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Meg Kruger
Meg@sweeneypr.com
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